Success as a Journey

“Success is a journey, not a destination.” Arthur Ashe.

I was writing a blog on goal setting, perseverance and success when in the middle of that flow of words pouring out onto the keyboard the computer crashed, and my file had not yet been saved. Hazards of writing at 4 in the morning, not awake enough to think of important things like backing up files and important things like getting more sleep when the muse has so obviously struck.

I was reminiscing that the last two years I have had my share of falling on my face with attempted success in children’s writers’ market. My first children’s book Loved Like Me is back online as of today and available for purchase. (I pulled it one day frustrated from my lack of sales which in retrospect I realise partly contributes to the fact that I really need to put more time in marketing the book.) I am also writing my second children’s book this fall through independent studies with a local art school which will soon learn that my ability to even draw a pretty stick figure is about a four out of a ten.

(Ctrl S) I really can’t believe it crashed…moving on…

I recently completed the first rewrite of my first feature script Witness. I have several eyes on it now giving me critical feedback as to how to improve important details like plot development, pace, creating more convincing conflict and such. I am hoping to start sending it out to potential producers by January when all the chaos from the impending holidays will have passed.

In my spare time, I have been carving out a makeshift photography studio in my home with a very basic budget, with a lot of do-it-yourself stuff and such. I have found, especially in the past year when I took my photography to a professional level and started freelancing as a photojournalist that the more I took photos, the more visual of a writer I became.

There is a connection between framing a photo and seeing what fits in the picture and what doesn’t, what makes a story and what doesn’t, how the pieces fit together to tell a compelling story, or don’t. I went from being someone who always struggled with being a visual writer as I wrote to being able to “see” what the picture in front of me looked like and what I needed to make that image, that story work. Now, this may not work for everyone, but it helped me so I throw it out there as a suggestion of things to try if you feel the ink well is drying up and you just can’t see the story you want to tell. Imagine it as a series of pictures telling a story from beginning to end.

Not a fan of photography? Tell your story in stick people, I believe you’d get a higher score than I gave myself and, you’d have a story. And now, coffee.

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